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Intimate Partner Violence and Patterns of Alcohol Abuse and Dependence Criteria Among Women: A Latent Class Analysis

Lareina N. La Flair, Catherine P. Bradshaw, Carla L. Storr, Kerry M. Green, Anika A. H. Alvanzo, Rosa M. Crum

Objective: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a major public health issue, yet little is known about the association between IPV victimization and problem drinking among women. Study objectives were to (a) identify subtypes of problem drinking among women according to abuse and dependence criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV); (b) examine the association between recent IPV and the problem drinking classes; and (c) evaluate major depressive disorder (MDD) as a mediator of the IPV-alcohol relationship. Method: Data come from a cohort of 11,782 female current drinkers participating in Wave 2 (2004–2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Latent class analysis was used to group participants into problem drinking classes according to 11 DSM-IV abuse and dependence criteria. The IPV measure was derived from six questions regarding abusive behaviors perpetrated by a romantic partner in the past year. Past-year MDD was assessed according to DSM-IV criteria. Latent class regression was used to test the association between drinking class and IPV. Results: Three classes of problem drinkers were identified: Severe (Class 1: 1.9%; n = 224), moderate (Class 2: 14.2%; n = 1,676), and nonsymptomatic (Class 3: 83.9%; n = 9,882). Past-year IPV was associated with severe and moderate classes (severe: adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 5.70, 95% CI [3.70, 8.77]; moderate: aOR = 1.92, 95% CI [1.43, 2.57]). Past-year MDD was a possible mediator of the IPV–drinking class relationship. Conclusions: Results indicate a strong association between recent IPV and problem drinking class membership. This study offers preliminary evidence that programs aimed at preventing problem drinking among women should take IPV and MDD into consideration. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs, 73, 351–360, 2012)